PALM OIL IS OFTEN USED TO REPLACE TRANS FAT. WHY? ARE THERE OTHER ALTERNATIVES?

Many manufacturers have switched to palm oil to replace the trans fat-laden partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) in their products. PHOs have been shown to increase heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk so health agencies worldwide have restricted their use.

Sustainable palm oil is a leading trans fat alternative because of its health, performance and sustainability qualities. Malaysian palm oil is an industry favorite because of its quality and wholesomeness, plus it’s responsibly produced.

After conducting an extensive review of alternatives, The Fatty Acid Expert Roundtable, a multidisciplinary panel of nutrition and clinical experts, reported that, “when a solid fat is required for product taste and functionality, the only saturated fatty options currently available to replace trans-fatty acids are palm oil or interesterified stearic acid.”

A 2007 report from David C. Klonoff, M.D., FACP, published in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, lists additional options, including genetically modified, interesterified and modified hydrogenated products as well as natural saturated oils. This reports cautions, “The long-term risks of ingested interesterified fats are unknown.”

The report also states that natural saturated oils were widely used in prepared foods until companies replaced them with soy, corn and sunflower hydrogenated oils. At the time, natural saturated oils were believed to increase the risk of heart disease. Since the report’s publication, a meta-analysis published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, shows there is no association between dietary saturated fats and cardiovascular disease risk.

Many manufacturers have switched to palm oil to replace the trans fat-laden partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) in their products. PHOs have been shown to increase heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk so health agencies worldwide have restricted their use.

Sustainable palm oil is a leading trans fat alternative because of its health, performance and sustainability qualities. Malaysian palm oil is an industry favorite because of its quality and wholesomeness, plus it’s responsibly produced.

After conducting an extensive review of alternatives, The Fatty Acid Expert Roundtable, a multidisciplinary panel of nutrition and clinical experts, reported that, “when a solid fat is required for product taste and functionality, the only saturated fatty options currently available to replace trans-fatty acids are palm oil or interesterified stearic acid.”

A 2007 report from David C. Klonoff, M.D., FACP, published in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, lists additional options, including genetically modified, interesterified and modified hydrogenated products as well as natural saturated oils. This reports cautions, “The long-term risks of ingested interesterified fats are unknown.”

The report also states that natural saturated oils were widely used in prepared foods until companies replaced them with soy, corn and sunflower hydrogenated oils. At the time, natural saturated oils were believed to increase the risk of heart disease. Since the report’s publication, a meta-analysis published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, shows there is no association between dietary saturated fats and cardiovascular disease risk.